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Royal Downtime: Autumn Shoe Staples #2

If you are looking for the comfort of slippers and the sophistication of riding boots all in one shoe, loafers are the way to go! Stay tuned for an introduction to the most decadent of all shoes, that will go with literally everything and make you feel like an aristocrat off duty. 

Loafers (or slip-ons) are lace-less shoes with a broad, low heel that distinguishes them from (completely flat) moccasins. Loafers expose the ankle and about a quarter of the instep, thus visually lengthening your legs. They are just as versatile as ballerinas, but more high-cut, and therefore look a lot more appropriate as soon as the temperatures drop below the 20°C mark. Loafer_Schuh

Women’s loafers come in a variety of materials and styles: All of them have got a more or less eccentric touch to them, which is why they should only be worn by women comfortable with making a fashion statement. If you approve of this special vibe, however, loafers will be your best friend in autumn! They virtually go with every cut of trousers, skirt or dress: As long as your outfit has got the same, semi-sophisticated vibe, a loafer will add a beautifully decadent touch. Here’s a quick introduction to some of the most popular loafers out there!

  • The Stern Ones: Wildsmith Loafers (1)

Just like Chelsea boots, loafers can be worn both by men and women. The first loafer was a men’s shoe, however, and is said to have been designed in 1926 by Raymond Lewis Wildsmith as a country house shoe for King George. This design was initially called the 582, and then the Model 98. Today, this particular model of loafers is known as the Wildsmith Loafer. Like Penny Loafers, Wildsmith Loafers feature a saddle and an apron, but in Wildsmiths, the apron ends about where your toes would start, whereas in Penny Loafers, it goes a bit lower down. Wildsmiths have also got a slightly more pointed shape than the almost square Penny Loafers. In women’s footwear, Wildsmiths are the most masculine and edgy loafer option and make for a real statement shoe. Here’s an example of a Wildsmith-inspired women’s loafer, that will give you an idea of this model’s stern, yet super-elegant and modern vibe:

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  • The Insolently Laid-Back Ones: Prince Albert Slippers (2)

Prince Albert Slippers are the most casual, feminine, but also provocative loafer model, because there’s only a fine line between these loafers and house shoes. At the moment, pony leather or velvet are the most popular materials for Prince Albert Slippers.

 

 

Loafer1

  • The Pronoucedly Old-Fashioned Ones: (Kiltie) Tassel Loafers (3)

More often than not, loafers come with some kind of embellishment, if only a saddle. Tassels, as another option, are an excellent choice if you want to emphasise this shoe’s archaic and aristocratic vibes. Loafers2

If you really want to go all-out, step up the 19-century-royalty vibe with a Kiltie Tassel loafer. My La Tenace loafers are as close as I will ever get to a mansion-in-the-countryside lifestyle: But at least my feet know what aristocracy would feel like 🙂 

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(1) John Baker’s Slipper by Spera is licensed under CC BY 2.0

(2) LK Bennett Melissa Slipper by Spera is licensed under CC BY 2.0

(3) John Baker’s Slipper by Spera is licensed under CC BY 2.0

Thumbnail: Loafer by Wikimedia Commons is licensed under CC BY-SA 2.0

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2 thoughts on “Royal Downtime: Autumn Shoe Staples #2

  1. Oh, dark green is one of my favourite colours in general and for autumn/winter in particular. They must be lovely! The brown pair is actually the first pair of loafers I’ve ever owned, but certainly not my last one. Enjoy the season, dear Alex 🙂

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